Insane Asylum: Yojoa Asylum

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Location: Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Built: Unknown
Operation Time: ? - ?
Type: Not Kirkbride Plan
Status: Open as a recreational park

History:

The Yojoa Asylum in Tegucigalpa, Honduras is currently a recreational park. Apparitions wearing white suits have been reported to stare out the windows of the building.

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Insane Asylum: Dejarnette Center

Dejarnette Center in Staunton, Virginia

Location: Staunton, Virginia, USA
Built: 1825
Operation Time: 1825 - 1996
Type: Not Kirkbride Plan
Status: Closed

History:

The Western Lunatic Asylum opened in 1825 as a hospital to treat the insane. In 1905, Dr. Joseph Dejarnette, a believer in eugenics, took over and renamed the asylum the Dejarnette Center. Dejarnette became abusive, and he tortured many of his patients.

In 1996, the Dejarnette Center shut down. While the decrepit asylum is off-limits to people, trespassers have reported hearing footsteps, doors opening and closing by themselves, moans, whispers, and screams.

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Insane Asylum: Maryville Center for Medically Complex Children

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Location: Chicago, Illinois, USA
Built: Unknown
Operation Time: ? - ?
Type: Not Kirkbride Plan
Status: Possibly turned into apartments

History:

The Maryville Center for Medically Complex Children was built as an asylum for drug-addicted, handicapped, insane, and foster children. Due to asbestos, the center had to be shut down and boarded up.

Now, the remains of the complex include an old playground, each of the alphabetically marked buildings, and an indoor pool. The Center for Medically Complex Children is filled with numerous stairwells, which provide access to about 75% of the center. It is rumored that the building has been torn down and has been replaced with apartments.

Paranormal activity includes the sounds of children laughing, apparitions of people in white robes, and the sound of disembodied footsteps.

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Insane Asylum: Aradale Mental Hospital

Aradale Mental Hospital in Ararat, Victoria, Australia

Location: Ararat, Victoria, Australia
Built: 1865
Operation Time: 1865 - 1998
Type: Not Kirkbride Plan
Status: Turned into college campus of the Northern Melbourne Institute of TAFE (NMIT) in 2001

History:

The Aradale Mental Hospital (originally known as the Ararat Lunatic Asylum) was built in Ararat, Victoria, Australia. The asylum, along with its sister hospitals at Kew and Beechworth, were founded in order to take care of the growing number of “lunatics” residing in the area.

In 1864, construction for the Ararat Lunatic Asylum began. Guardhouses were built two years later in 1866. According to hospital records, patients were admitted as early as 1865. The psychiatric hospital was designed by G. W. Vivian and his assistant, J. J. Clark. The Kew Lunatic Asylum and Beechworth Asylum were worked on at the same time, however, Ararat was finished before its sisters.

Contradicting popular belief, patients did not build the asylum; the project was contracted to O’Grady, Glynn, and O’Callaghan. Like several mental institutions of the 19th century, the Ararat Lunatic Asylum featured a town within a town, featuring its own market gardens, orchard, vineyards, and livestock.

During its peak, the hospital had over 500 staff members and had 63 buildings. After 1998, the asylum housed female prisoners during the building and renovation of the Dame Phyllis Frost Centre until the current management took over in 2001, turning it into a college.

In December, 1886, the jail portion of Ararat Lunatic Asylum was proclaimed “J Ward”, which would hold anyone currently held at any jail or reformatory who appeared to be insane. Another mental institution was eventually built in Sunbury to hold the criminally insane. “J Ward” was closed 102 years later in May, 1988.

In the early 1990s, Ararat Lunatic Asylum (now known as the Aradale Mental Hospital) began its decommissioning process by transferring the patients to other facilities. By December, 1993, the only remaining ward was the Ararat Forensic Psychiatry Centre.

In 1997, all remaining patients were transferred to Rosanna, where they waited until the new Thomas Embling Hospital in Fairfield was finished.

In 2001, the Victorian Government gave $7.4 million to NMIT in order to establish a campus for the Australian College of Wine on the site of the Aradale Mental Hospital. Vineyards and olive groves were planted in 2002, and a olive processing facility and winery were eventually added onto the site.

The Aradale Mental Hospital has been subject to the paranormal due to patient deaths within the hospital. The most frequently investigated areas of the building include administration, the men’s and women’s wards, the chapel, the kitchen, the hospital, and the morgue.

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Insane Asylum: The Insane Asylum in Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
Built: Unknown
Operation Time: ? – ?
Type: Not Kirkbride Plan
Status: Closed

History:

Though the owners of the abandoned asylum’s property are extremely strict about trespassers, a few have actually gotten in. Those who have entered have reported a large black cloud hovering above them. Some photographs even depict said cloud. The story goes that one patient became so uncontrollably insane that he massacred several doctors, nurses, and patients. It was forced to close down afterwards, as things weren’t quite the same.

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Insane Asylum: Anoka State Hospital

Anoka State Hospital in Anoka, Minnesota

Location: Anoka, Minnesota, USA
Built: Unknown
Operation Time: 1898 - Present
Type: Not Kirkbride Plan
Status: Open

History:

Over the years, Anoka State Hospital has gone by many names – First State Asylum for the Insane, Anoka State Asylum, and most recently Anoka-Metro Regional Treatment Center (its current name). Built in 1898, it opened two years later in 1900, where it would serve as a patient-transfer hospital for the next fifty years.

Anoka’s patient population was made up of transfers from overcrowded asylums looking to downgrade the population. The first 100 patients to be sent to Anoka State Hospital were males from St. Peter State Hospital, each of them called “chronic incurables” by the psychiatrists who treated them.

Six years later, a total of 115 female patients were added into the asylum. In 1909, the Minnesota government decided that Anoka State Hospital would be used for female transfer patients only, and that all of the males would be sent to the other state hospital in Hastings.

In 1925, the asylum received another wing that would allow male patients to be accepted once more.The hospital was renamed the Anoka State Asylum in 1919.

Eventually, in 1937, the hospital was renamed Anoka State Hospital to sound less aggressive. The hospital allowed new patients admit to the hospital in 1951. However, the hospital was not without its flaws. Patients suffered both physical and mental mistreatment and medical experimentation.

Neglect and intentional cruelty were not unheard of at the hospital either. Patients looking for a way out of the asylum would escape into the tunnels located below the buildings. Those who couldn’t find a way out would hang themselves on the heavy pipes that were on the ceiling of the catacombs.

Paranormal occurrences include strange noises, whispers, laughter, and talking in the tunnels. Footsteps and cold spots are also commonplace. The tunnels are now only accessible to maintenance and security. Now named the Anoka-Metro Regional Treatment Center, the hospital continues to admit patients.

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Insane Asylum: Cedarcrest Mental Asylum

Cedarcrest Mental Asylum in Berlin, Connecticut

Location: Berlin, Connecticut, USA
Built: Unknown
Operation Time: ? - ?
Type: Not Kirkbride Plan
Status: Closed

History:

The Cedarcrest Mental Asylum is located just off the Berlin Turnpike, and it is surrounded by a wooded area. The sounds of screaming and door slamming can be heard coming from the old, defunct hospital.

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Insane Asylum: Buffalo State Hospital

Buffalo State Hospital in Buffalo, New YorkLocation: Buffalo, New York, USA
Built: 1871
Operation Time: 1880 – 1974
Type: Kirkbride Plan
Status: Converting into a hotel

History:

The Buffalo State Hospital, also known as the “Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane”, “H.H. Richardson Complex”, “Buffalo State Lunatic Asylum”, and “Buffalo Psychiatric Center”, was built in 1871 with two medieval-style towers under the name Buffalo State Asylum. The appearance of the hospital has been compared with that of Danvers State Lunatic Asylum.

In 1870, Henry Richardson was assigned with the task of designing the hospital, which gave him the chance to show off his architectural style that would later become known as Richardsonian Romanesque. Like many asylums of the time, the Kirkbride Plan was utilized, meaning that the asylum had to consist of five wards that step out on either side of the central administration building.

Patients were sorted out by gender, and the most dangerous or criminally insane patients were put in the tips of the wings in order to keep them as far from administration as possible. The wards were separated by the curved, catacomb-ike hallways, and the building was topped with a copper roof. In the case of a fire, there were massive iron doors to isolate a ward.

Most of the building materials in the hospital were Medina sandstone, which gave the buildings their dark color. In 1878, budget issues forced Richardson to use brick on the three outer wards. The 185-foot-tall towers and the male wing opened in 1880, and the female wing followed fifteen years later in 1895. The building’s construction was completed in 1895, even though Richardson had died nine years before in 1886.

Like many hospitals during the late 19th century and early 20th century, the patient population soared while the work force fell. This harmed Dr. Thomas Story Kirkbride’s original plan of a peaceful, happy, and sanitary mental hospital. The maximum occupancy was exceeded in the thousands, forcing some of the patients to sleep in the halls or outside.

The east side’s brick wards were eventually demolished in the 1960s to make way for a new building. The main Kirkbride building’s patients were removed and transferred to other mental hospitals in 1974. A year later, the hospital was renamed Buffalo Psychiatric Center, even despite the hospital had closed.

Eventually, plans were made to the administration building as a school. Construction and asbestos abatement equipment were brought onto the property, but nothing ever became of the building. The government of Buffalo, New York kept the building up rather than tearing it down for housing developments.

Every night, they used lights to illuminate it, and used Plexiglass instead of boards to protect the windows. Overall, they kept a close eye on the building. However, in April, 2010, a fire greatly damaged the hospital. It is highly theorized that the hospital is haunted due to the fact that there was so much suffering. Since the building has been mostly fixed, tours are now available. It is expected to become a hotel by 2015.

Ghostly World: Buffalo State Hospital

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Insane Asylum: Ospedale Pedagogico di Aguscello

Ospedale Pedagogico di Aguscello in Ferrera, Italy

Location: Ferrera, Italy
Built: 1870s
Operation Time: ? – 1970
Type: Not Kirkbride Plan
Status: Abandoned

History:

Ospedale Pedagogico di Aguscello (also known as the Ospedale Psichiatrico Infantile di Aguscellois) is haunted by the “insane” children who used to live at the hospital. The nuns that worked there are believed to have tortured the patients, and there are some on-site graves suggesting that they killed them.

Originally, it was built as a residence in the 1870s, but the building changed several times over the years. Eventually, it was purchased by Doctor Bernardi, who wanted to turn it into a tuberculosis hospital. It was sold to the Italian Red Cross, called Croce Rossa, in 1940.

It converted into a hospital for children with both physical and mental illnesses. Ospedale Pedagogico di Aguscello closed in 1970, and it has been abandoned for more than 40 years. It is unknown if the building will return to use.

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Insane Asylum: The Insane Asylum in Dunwoody, Georgia

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Location: Dunwoody, Georgia, USA
Built: Unknown
Operation Time: ? – ?
Type: Not Kirkbride Plan
Status: Unknown (possibly torn down and turned into a skate park)

History:

The insane asylum in Dunwoody, Georgia is haunted by the patients who were abused there. Paranormal activity includes a cool breeze coming through a room without windows, ghosts of dead bodies lying in the morgue trays in the basement’s morgue, feeling presences behind you,  and footsteps descending the stairs. Rumor has it that the hospital was torn down and turned into a skate park, but it is unconfirmed.

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